Research Training/Scholarly Activity:

Fellows have 18-20 months for scholarly activity that may include clinical and translational research, leadership of a quality improvement or patient safety initiative, and/or development of a novel educational curriculum. There are multiple opportunities to work with several successful faculty researchers not only in the Pulmonology section, but also in Allergy/Immunology, Infectious Disease, Critical Care sections, among others.

A Scholarship Oversight Committee (SOC) will be established with each fellow to provide additional guidance towards successful completion of each project, with the expectation that each project effort will result in manuscript(s) for presentation at national meetings and submission to an academic journal.

Additional training in biostatistics and research skills comes through participation in shared common core courses sponsored and provided by the Department of Pediatrics to all pediatric fellows as well as working with a research mentor on a defined scholarly project.

Each fellow will also participate in quality improvement projects/initiatives during their fellowship.  It is the expectation by both the program and ACGME that each fellow develop, implement, and follow progress of a QI project during their fellowship in an area of their choosing with the guidance of a faculty member.

 

Samples of Fellow Research Publications (this is not a complete list)

  1. El Taoum K, Xi J, Kim JW, Berlinski A. In-vitro Evaluation of Nebulized Aerosols Via Nasal Route. Respir Care 2015; 60(7):1015-1025. doi: 10.4187/respcare.03606.
  2. Awad S, Williams DK, Berlinski A. Longitudinal evaluation of compressor/nebulizer performance. Respir Care 2014; 59:1053-1061. doi: 10.4187/respcare.02776.
  3. Berlinski A, Chavez A. Albuterol delivery via metered dose inhaler in a spontaneously breathing pediatric tracheostomy model. Pediatr Pulmonol 2013; 48:1026-1034. doi: 10.1002/ppul.22715.
  4. Carroll JL, Agarwal A, Donnelly DF, Kim I. Purinergic modulation of carotid body glomus cell hypoxia response during postnatal maturation in rats. Adv Exp Med Biol 2012; 758:249-253. doi: 10.1007/978-94-007-4584-1_34.
  5. Chavez A, McCracken A, Berlinski A. Effect of face mask dead volume, respiratory rate, and tidal volume on inhaled albuterol delivery. Pediatr Pulmonol; 2010; 45:224-229. doi: 10.1002/ppul.21156.
  6. Carroll JL, Agarwal A. Development of ventilator control in infants. Paediatr Respir Rev 2010; 11:199-207. doi: 10.1016/j.prrv.2010.06.002.
  7. Carroll JL, Kim I, Dbouk H, Yang DJ, Bavis RW, Donnelly DF. Time-dependence of hyperoxia-induced impairment in peripheral chemoreceptor activity and glomus cell calcium response. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2009; 648:299-306. doi: 10.1007/978-90-481-2259-2_34.
  8. Donnelly DF, Bavis RW, Kim I, Dbouk HA, Carroll JL. Time course of alterations in pre- and post-synaptic chemoreceptor function during developmental hyperoxia. Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2009 Sep 30;168(3):189-97. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2009.05.005.